Panayotis D. Cangelaris - Greek Diplomat and Collector
 

"WORLD SCOUT MOVEMENT"

 Philatelic Exhibit
 This exhibit traces the history of the World Scout Movement through the stamps issued around the world to honor it's social merits.  It is divided in eleven main parts:

(1)  St. George - The Scouts Patron Saint
(2)  Mafeking - The Origins of Scouting
(3)  Baden-Powell - The Founder and his Legacy
(4)  The Principles of Scouting
(5)  The Scout Emblem, Sign, Salute and Handshake
(6)  The Scout Uniform, Badges and Awards
(7)  The Scouting Sections
(8)  The Scouting Activities
(9)  The Scout Jamborees and Conferences
(10)  The Girl Guides and Activities
(11)  Personalities in Scouting and Guiding

[An introduction and a sample from the material contained in the exhibit are shown here]

Introduction

Scouting is about participating with friends, as a team, in the adventure and opportunities of life.  Scouts are encouraged to participate in outdoor activities and both the traditional Scouting skills (such as camping, survival and cooking) as well as a wide range of adventures (anything from abseiling to yachting) are part of their programme.  That helps them find out about the world in which they live, know better their own abilities and the importance of keeping fit, as well as to explore their values and personal attitudes and develop their creative talents in order to achieve such qualities as initiative, courage, and resourcefulness.

In 1907, Lieut. General Baden-Powell was encouraged to re-write his book Aids to Scouting” (published in 1899 for NCO’s and Men), so that it would appeal to boys.  But before doing so he planned out the idea and then tested it with the help of some twenty boys of all sorts in a camp at Brownsea Island, where they lived together for a fortnight.  A year later (1908) he wrote “Scouting for Boys” intending it to be useful to the then existing boys' organisations.  But, from those boys who reading the book (as it came out in fortnightly parts) had taken up the game for themselves, the World Scout Movement was born.

ST. GEORGE

THE SCOUTS PATRON SAINT

St. George is the Patron Saint of Boy Scouts everywhere in the World

Double impression of black color
 

 

MAFEKING

THE ORIGINS OF SCOUTING

 The Siege of Mafeking (1900) during the Boer War in South Africa gave birth to the Idea of Scouting.  As the town run out of stamps, two new values (1p and 3p) were printed with the cyanotype photography process.  The first showed the portrait of Colonel Baden-Powell, defender of the city and later (1907) Founder of the Scout Movement.  The first print measured 18,5 mm, but was followed by a 21 mm one.

 

 


 

 

The second value showed the leader of the boys who run the postal and messenger service, Sergeant-Major Warner Goodyear, referred to as the First Boy Scout.
 

 


[View:  "The Mafeking Blues 1900"]

 

 

BADEN-POWELL

THE FOUNDER AND HIS LEGACY

Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell (1857-1941), Sir Robert since 1922 and Lord Baden-Powell of Gilwell since 1929,  was acclaimed as Chief Scout of the World in 1920.  World Scout Movement’s Golden Jubilee (1957) coincided with the 100th anniversary of his birth.  These celebrations gave the opportunity for the issue of a number of postage stamps depicting him in a variety of pictures.  Painted by David Jagger in 1929,  his official scout portrait was presented to him during  the III World Jamboree at Arrow Park, Birkenhead in England. 

 

 

 
     Imperforate
 
 Imperforate
 
 
 
 Artist's proof signed by the designer
 
 
 
 
 
THE PRINCIPLES OF SCOUTING

Scouting is based in three broad Principles:  Duty to God, Duty to Other and Duty to Self.  These Principles are defined in the Scout Promise and the Scout Law.

 
 
 
 
 THE SCOUT EMBLEM, SIGN, SALUTE AND HANDSHAKE

Together with their Law and Promise, Boy Scouts recognize themselves through their insignias, salute, handshake, uniform and activities.

 
 
 
 Hand painted working rough sketch, signed by the Artist
 

1918 CZECH SCOUT POST

 The Sea Scouts of Prague (Nov. 7-25, 1918) provided postal service for the National Committee of Liberation of their country.  Two values (10h and 20h) were issued.  They are the first scouts on stamps following the foundation of Scouting.

 
 
 “Arrival of President Massaryk” Overprint (Dec. 21, 1918) Cancellation (N.V.) “National Committee”
 
 1920 SIAM

 To support Scouting in his country, King Rama VI of Siam let 19 stamps of earlier issues (1906-1920)  be overprinted by three types of overprint (I, II and III).

 
Overprint type I Overprint type II Overprint type III
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Imperforate
First Day of Issue
 
 
 Imperforate
 
 THE SCOUT UNIFORM, BADGES AND AWARDS

Scouts are allowed to wear distinctive badges awarded to them in recognition of their physical, mental and spiritual development that lead to the discovery and improvement of their skills and abilities.

 

 

 
 
 

 

 
    
 

 

 
 
 

 

THE SCOUTING SECTIONS

Scouting is divided in Sections of age and field of activities.  Its main Sections are Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts and Venture Scouts (age definition) and Sea and Air Scouts (activity definition).

 
 

 

 
 
 

 

 
 
 

 

 
 Imperforate
 

 

 
  Imperforate
 

 

 
 Hand painted Artist's design on thick card
 

 

THE SCOUTING ACTIVITIES

Among the normal activities of a Boy Scout are orienteering, hiking, camping, cooking, sporting, communicating, constructing and serving the community.  A campfire usually concludes his camp activities.

 
 
 1925 HUNGARY

 Hungary has the honor of being the first country to picture a Boy Scout on a postage stamp.  

 
 
 Imperforate
 

1931 and 1932 ROMANIA

 Romania has the honor of being the first country to issue a set of stamps picturing scout activities and to commemorate a Scout Jamboree on a postage stamp (National Jamboree at Sibiu). 

 
 
“SPECIMEN” overprint 
 
 
 
 
 
 Imperforate
 
 
 
 
  Imperforate
 
 
 First Day of Issue
 
 
Imperforate
 
 
Artist's Proof
 
 
  Imperforate
 
 
 
 
 
 Imperforate
 
 
 Delux Proof
 
 
 
THE SCOUT JAMBOREES AND CONFERENCES

Scout Jamborees are regular get-together between scouts at national, regional or world levels.  The first World Scout Jamboree took place in London, England U.K. (1920).  The World Scout Conference is the "General Assembly" of Scouting.

 
 
 
 
 
 Imperforate
 
 
4th World Jamboree stamps and cancellation on an Esperanto commemorative folio
 
 
 
 

 

 
 Lakehurst crash disaster (May 6, 1937).  Burned cover (right) bearing a stamp of the 5th World Jamboree picked up from the crashed airship Zeppelin LZ129 "Hindenburg" together with its content (left).  Protected within U.S.P.O.D. sealed wrapper (above)
 
 
 First Day of Issue
 
THE GIRL GUIDES AND ACTIVITIES

The Girl Guides Movement was founded by Baden-Powell in 1910, just three years after he officially introduced Scouting in his country.  At the beginning he was helped by his sister Agnes Baden-Powell (1858-1945), who became the first President of the Movement.  In 1912 he met his future wife, Olave St.Claire Soames (1889-1977), who soon became actively involved in the Guide and Scout Movements and was appointed Chief Commissioner in 1916, Chief Guide in 1918 and World Chief Guide in 1930.  Hungary has the honor of issuing the first ever Girl Guides series of stamps (1939).

 
 1938 LITHUANIA

 Boy Scouts and Girl Guides overprints commemorating the 20th anniversary of Scouting in Lithuania and the National Jamboree at Penemune.  Comprises the first ever Girl Guides overprint.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Imperforate
 
PERSONALITIES IN SCOUTING AND GUIDING

Several personalities received Scouting and later Guiding under their patronage since early years and some of them had active service within.

 
 
 
 
 
 Original artwork with transparent overlay
 
 

To view the full exhibit online, please click here





 

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